Welcome to C.A.A.R.M: Board Certified in Anti Aging Medicine
C.A.A.R.M- Melbourne, FL

Did you know?

50% of Heart Attack victims have normal cholesterol.1

That’s because multiple factors in addition to cholesterol are required to determine the underlying cause of Heart Attack.2

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Beyond Cholesterol testing.
Beyond Plaque testing.

Finally, a blood test for the
leading cause of Heart Attacks:

Unstable Cardiac Lesion Rupture.

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The PULS (Protein Unstable Lesion Signature) Test measures the most clinically-significant protein biomarkers that measure the body's immune system response to arterial injury.3

These injuries lead to the formation and progression of cardiac lesions which may become unstable and rupture, leading to cardiac event.

PULS Proteins

Cholesterol

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PULS Comprehensive Cardiac Profile

What are Unstable Cardiac Lesions and how do they form?

Unstable Cardiac Lesions form within the artery wall over time, often without any signs or symptoms, through a process of continuous arterial injury and
repair.4,5

Healthy artery wall

VS.

Artery wall with Unstable Cardiac Lesion in danger of rupturing

PULS test results can help
prevent a heart attack -
starting now.

The PULS Test can provide your physician with valuable information that can be used to determine the most appropriate course of action according to clinical guidelines.

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PULS Profile

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Your personalized 5-Year Cardiac Profile of Unstable Cardiac Lesion Rupture (Heart Attack).

Heart Age

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Your “Heart Age” which shows your Cardiac Score relative to your Age and Gender group.

Lifestyle Changes

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Recommended lifestyle modifications that may help maintain or improve your current cardiac health.

Contact us today to get your test done

Puls (Protein Unstable Lipid Signature) Package: $500

The Puls testing package will include the following:

An initial consultation with Dr. Smith for 60 minutes to review your complete medical history with a detailed cardiovascular history and co-morbidities to have the PULS testing to be performed.

Your blood will be drawn in our office and will be sent off to the PULS testing laboratory located in California by Federal Express Overnight . Results are usually available to Dr Smith within 7-10 business days. Once the results are back they will be initially reviewed by Dr Smith and a follow-up appointment will be made within 1 week. If results are in the extremely abnormal and in the dangerous range an appointment will be made earlier and a referral to the patients cardiologist or a cardiologist of Dr Smith’s choosing will be done.

NOTE THAT THIS DOES NOT INCLUDE THE COST OF THE PULS TESTING ITSELF. MOST INSURANCE COMPANIES INCLUDING MEDICARE WILL PAY FOR THIS TEST. SPECIAL PRICING IS AVALAIBLE FOR PATIENTS WHOSE INSURANCE WILL NOT PAY FOR THE TEST OR WHOM WANT TO PAY OUT OF THEIR POCKET. ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE MADE WITH PULS COMPANY IN ADVANCE.

Take the first step towards better heart health. Call us at 321-421-7111

References

1.) Sachdeva, et al. Lipid levels in patients hospitalized with coronary artery disease: An analysis of 136,905 hospitalizations in Get With The Guidelines. AHJ. 2009; 157; Issue 1
2.) Kromhout, et al. Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease by Diet and Lifestyle. Circulation. 2002; 105: 893-898
3.) Nolan, et al. Analytical performance validation of a coronary heart disease risk assessment multi-analyte proteomic test. Expert Opin Med Diagn. 2013 Mar;7; Issue 2:127-36.
4.) Stary, et al. A Definition of Advanced Types of Atherosclerotic Lesions and a Histological Classification of Atherosclerosis. Circulation.1995; 92: 1355-1374
5.) van der Wal, Becker. Atherosclerotic plaque rupture – pathologic basis of plaque stability and instability. Cardiovascular Research. 1999 Feb 1; 41; Issue 2.